5 Reasons to Learn Java in school and Why It Rocks!

5 Reasons to Learn Java and Why It Rocks

Are you dreaming to have a successful career in IT and wondering which programming language is the best to start with? Learning to program opens up endless opportunities, and there are lots of programming languages to choose from. A good idea is to learn Java which has proved that it’s one of the best programming languages around over the course of more than 20 years. Read on to learn about the most important reasons why you should learn Java programming.

 

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Java Is Easy to Learn

Actually, it’s one of the top reasons to learn Java. The language has an easy syntax with not many magic characters so you if you become familiar with the key concepts and procedures, you will be able to write a program in Java. There are tons of online resources that can help you in the learning process but be ready to work hard and focus on coding if you want to become a Java expert.

It’s common knowledge that students who study computer sciences usually don’t like writing essays which they have to complete to graduate with a degree. Learning to code requires much time and effort, and numerous essays and term papers make students feel overwhelmed and lead to a stressful college experience. Luckily, there are online writing agencies and ordering sample papers on a reliable website can be a good solution to relieve stress and have more time to focus on the subjects that really matter.

Lots of Jobs Opportunities

Java is widely used in the real world. According to the TIOBE index for July 2018, Java is the most popular programming language so it continues to create jobs in the tech industry. Java programming skills are in great demand almost everywhere. Java is platform independent and can work on anything from smartphones to Kindle e-readers, cars, medical devices and much more. It enables cloud development within the IoT and for enterprising in different industries. This feature attracts lots of new development. Java programmers outnumber any other programming language professionals, and they are among the highest paid programmers with an average salary of $69,722 in a year’s time.

It Is Open Source

We all like free things. Java is free so developers don’t have to pay anything to create Java applications. Costs are very important if an organization wants to use a technology or when you want to learn a programming language. Anyone can build and execute applications absolutely free with Java. This feature helped Java become popular among large organizations and individual programmers.

Java has a great collection of open source libraries contributed by Google, Apache, and other organizations. These libraries make Java development fast, cost-effective, and easy. There are also frameworks like Maven, Struts, and Spring.

Java Community

There are more than 10 million Java developers in the world, and this strong and thriving community continues to grow. There are a lot of active forums, Stack Overflow, different Java users groups, where beginners and advanced programmers can get free help from community experts. As a newcomer, you can always get free advice from experienced programmers.

Rich API

It’s the crucial factor behind Java’s success. Java is highly flexible and provides API for almost everything – utilities, networking, database connection, I/O, XML parsing. Java has a powerful IDE that makes development fluent, easier, and faster. NetBeans and Eclipse make coding in Java a pleasant experience. You can get everything you need if you couple Java with a wide variety of tools supported by the open source ecosystem – JconSole, decompilers, ANT, and Maven for creating Java applications, Visual VM for checking Heap usage, and more.

 

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